Wednesday, September 17, 2014

The fun book of scary stuff

Emily Jenkins wrote, i illustrated.
It's so much fun to work on Emily's fun(yes, it's fun, told you so in the title)characters.

Puddle

I've been working on this book this summer. And here's the test print, i'm very pleased.

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Hornbook mentioned..

http://www.hbook.com/2014/09/choosing-books/recommended-books/picture-book-sequels-youve-waiting/
Those strong-willed sisters fromThe Twins’ Blanket are back in The Twins’ Little Sister, a fresh take on both the sibling-rivalry and new-baby themes. Ever competitive, they are now fighting over Mom’s attention when, despite their objections, Mom brings home a new baby sister. Author/illustrator Hyewon Yum’s twins are believably childlike in their directness and self-centeredness. Each step forward in accepting the baby has its source in a self-interested motive, but accept her they finally do — and the twist at the end is both funny and fitting. Collage elements add texture and interest to the gouache illustrations. (Farrar/Foster, 3–5 years)

Monday, September 15, 2014

bccb review for twins' little sister

The twins from The Twins’ Blanket (BCCB10/11) have returned, and they’re still not very good at sharing, especially sharing their mother (“We have only one mom. This is a big problem”). Now there’s a new little sister, and the twins don’t have much mom attention to fight over, so what do they do? Fight about taking care of their little sister, of course (“The only problem now is we need another one”). It’s refreshing to see a new baby book that focuses on the effect on existing sibling dynamics, and the strong-willed twosome, with the text entirely their dialogue, continues to be authentically endearing and annoying at the same time. Yum’s il- lustrations are spare and airy, with casually careful compositions making clear the childlike ease of the drafting is a deliberate choice; daubs of warm-toned paint (the kids are glowingly rosy-cheeked) gain rhythm from occasional uses of pattern, as in the girls’ polka-dotted dresses. Kids similarly afflicted with the requirement to share will find kindred spirits in the twins. DS

Friday, July 11, 2014

Starred review from PW!!

Having solved their blanket-sharing dilemma in The Twins’ Blanket, the twins at the center of this companion book are jostling for their mother’s time and attention. Those resources are in even shorter supply after a baby sister enters the picture. Yum packs a novel’s worth of emotion into her pages, from the twins’ unvarnished initial assessment of their sibling (“The baby is red and ugly. She looks like the bread in a paper bag”) to the hard-to-shake disappointments and jealousies that eventually give way to competitive attempts to be the better big sister. A sensitive, true-to-life story of a family’s growth that never turns saccharine. Ages 3–6. Agent: Sean McCarthy, Sean McCarthy Literary Agency. (Aug.)

Wednesday, June 18, 2014

Anyone who can write a children’s story without a moral, had better do so: that is, if he is going to write children’s stories at all. The only moral that is of any value is that which arises inevitably from the whole cast of the author’s mind.
- C.S Lewis: Of Other Worlds: Essays and Stories